black garlic oil recipe mayu final product - ginger, garlic, onion

    Black garlic oil final product

    Black garlic oil (mayu), a simple yet souped-up version of a common Japanese ramen condiment that combines the powerful flavors of three common aromatics, allowing you to add a delicious punch of umami flavor to add depth to any Asian soup dish.

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    black garlic oil mayu recipe for ramen atop garlic cooking on stovetop and burnt garlic condiment

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    Time:25 min (5 prep, 20 cook)
    Calories:39 (per serving)
    Good For:Ramen, Asian noodle soup dishes

    What is Mayu?

    Mayu, also known as burnt garlic oil, is a Japanese condiment that is traditionally made by cooking garlic in oil until the garlic is burnt black. By itself, it tastes just like how you’d expect burnt garlic to taste and is very bitter. However, when a small amount is added to ramen, it infuses the broth with an added layer of amazing flavor complexity.

    Difference Between Mayu and Black Garlic

    Mayu is often confused with or wrongly associated with black garlic, which is not exactly the same thing. Black garlic is made by taking normal garlic cloves and then putting them through a low-heat, weeks-long aging process that results in a fermentation occurring, which turns the garlic black. It is possible to make black garlic at home, but easier to just buy it from stores that carry specialty food items, like Trader Joes or Whole Foods.

    Mayu is often called black garlic oil because it uses garlic, and the final product looks black. However, mayu does not actually use black garlic. The texture and flavor of black garlic aren’t quite right for mayu, so please note that recipe just calls for regular garlic. This actually is a good thing, because black garlic is definitely more expensive and more difficult to find.

    ingredients for black garlic oil mayu recipe ginger, garlic, onion

    3 ingredients for flavorful black garlic oil: garlic, ginger, and onion

    Scott’s version of mayu uses more than just garlic – it incorporates three commonly-used aromatics into a delicious Asian soup topper. This is one of those things that will make you look like a kitchen rock star to your audience, even though it’s actually quite easy to make.

    Although the garlic is traditionally cooked until very dark brown or black, Scott prefers to stop short of there to avoid having any bitterness.

    Ingredients

    • ¼ cup finely minced onion
    • 2 Tbsp finely minced garlic
    • 2 Tbsp finely minced or grated ginger
    • 2 Tbsp olive oil
    • 1 Tbsp Bragg’s Liquid Amino

     

    Supplies

    black garlic oil recipe mayu - cooking ingredients

    Nice, browned garlic simmering on stove

    How to Make Mayu Black Garlic Oil – Step by Step

    Step 1. Combine onion, ginger, garlic, and oil in a small pan.

    Step 2. Saute over medium heat approximately 15 minutes or until most of the moisture is cooked out and a deep brown color develops. Stir frequently to prevent burning. Keep a close eye on the pan. Once the browning begins, it will advance fairly quickly.

    Step 3. Remove from heat just before it reaches your desired doneness as the carryover heat will finish it off. Carefully stir in Bragg’s Liquid Amino to avoid splashing.

    black garlic oil recipe mayu final product - ginger, garlic, onion

    Black garlic oil final product

    Tips & Uses

    • Other recipes call for putting contents in a blender to create the oil. This recipe stops short of that.
    • Goes well with ramen of any kind, as well as many other Asian noodle/soup dishes. Dollop about ½ tsp into each bowl and mix. It will add a wonderful aroma and savoriness to the broth.
    • Unused mayu can be refrigerated for up to a week.
    • This recipe can easily be scaled up or down. Just remember: 2 parts onion, 1 part garlic, 1 part ginger.
    • As a side note, don’t get this mixed up with rayu, a similar Japanese condiment that uses peppers. You’ll be in for an unpleasant surprise if you aren’t a fan of having a little heat in your dish.

    Variations & Substitutions

    Soy sauce may be substituted for Bragg’s Liquid Amino, but the amount used should be reduced since soy sauce is much saltier.

    Mayu Black Garlic Oil (Mayu)
    Prep Time
    5 mins
    Cook Time
    20 mins
    Total Time
    25 mins
     

    A souped-up version of a common Japanese ramen condiment that combines the powerful flavors of three common aromatics, allowing you to add a delicious punch of flavor to any Asian soup dish

    Course: Condiment, Sauce, Topping, Side Dish
    Cuisine: Japanese
    Keyword: black garlic oil, japanese condiment, mayu, ramen topping
    Servings: 8 servings
    Calories: 39 kcal
    Author: Stacy
    Ingredients
    • 1/4 cup onion finely minced
    • 2 tbsp garlic finely minced
    • 2 tbsp ginger finely minced or grated
    • 1 tbsp Bragg's Liquid Amino
    Instructions
    1. Combine onion, ginger, garlic, and oil in a small pan.

    2. Saute over medium heat approximately 15 minutes or until most of the moisture is cooked out and a deep brown color develops. Stir frequently to prevent burning. Keep a close eye on the pan. Once the browning begins, it will advance fairly quickly.

    3. Remove from heat just before it reaches your desired doneness as the carryover heat will finish it off. Carefully stir in Bragg’s Liquid Amino to avoid splashing.

    Recipe Notes

    Tips & Uses:
    Goes well with ramen of any kind, as well as many other Asian noodle/soup dishes. Dollop about ½ tsp into each bowl and mix. It will add a wonderful aroma and savoriness to the broth. Unused mayu can be refrigerated for up to a week.
     
    This recipe can easily be scaled up or down. Just remember: 2 parts onion, 1 part garlic, 1 part ginger.
     
    Variations & Substitutions:
    Soy sauce may be substituted for Bragg’s Liquid Amino, but the amount used should be reduced since soy sauce is much saltier.

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